Category Archives: Healthcare Law

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FTC Brings First Hospital Merger Challenge Since 2016

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced on February 27 that it has filed an administrative complaint challenging the proposed merger of Jefferson Health (Jefferson) and Albert Einstein Healthcare Network (Einstein), two Philadelphia-area hospital systems. The action is the FTC’s first hospital merger challenge since late 2016, when the agency successfully challenged the Hershey/Pinnacle Health transaction, also in Pennsylvania.

In this … Continue Reading

FTC Commissioners Call for Study on the Competitive Effects of Consummated Healthcare Transactions that Did Not Previously Receive Regulatory Review

The Federal Trade Commission announced on February 11, 2020 that it had issued Special Orders to five large technology companies, requiring them to provide information to the FTC concerning all corporate acquisitions they have completed over the last ten years that had not previously been required to be submitted for review by the FTC under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act (HSR). The … Continue Reading

OCR Fee Limits for Third Party Directive Record Requests Struck Down

On January 28, 2020, the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Office for Civil Rights (OCR) issued a notice (the OCR Notice) regarding individuals’ right of access to health records in response to a January 23, 2020 court ruling in the Ciox Health, LLC v. Azar, et al., No. 18-cv-0040 (D.D.C. Jan. 23, 2020) case. OCR noted that … Continue Reading

Sutter Health Settles California Attorney General Antitrust Case With Cash and an Agreement to Make Significant Changes to its Operations

The terms of a settlement that resolved antitrust litigation between the State of California and Sutter Health, the largest health system in Northern California, have now become public, almost two months after the settlement put an end to the case. The settlement, which was inked only days before a trial in the case was set to begin, includes both the … Continue Reading

Hackers Raise the Stakes By Possibly Causing Physical Harm

Computer hacking, and the permutation of crimes that can be committed by hackers, generally does not spur images of infliction of physical harm. However, in a chilling turn of events, computer hackers have opened a new front in the damage that can be inflicted through cybercrime. In a nefarious series of developments, cyber-liabilities now arise from remote manipulation of the … Continue Reading

Is A Federal Privacy Law In The Cards for 2020?

In May of 2018, the European Union enacted the General Data Protection Rules, or GDPR, a legal framework that outlines not only how companies may collect and process personal information of EU residents, but how that data is stored and used. Since its enactment, GDPR has triggered a global push towards compliance with those standards. In the United States, there … Continue Reading

You Can’t Always Get What You Want

The Florida Fifth District Court of Appeal harmonized the interpretation of state statutory and constitutional language in the first post Amendment 7 case dealing with access to adverse medical incident reports and their use at trial. The Florida statutory prohibition against the use and admissibility of certain incident reports was postulated to conflict with the state constitutional access to adverse … Continue Reading

FTC Investigating the Competitive Effects of Certificates of Public Advantage

The Federal Trade Commission has issued orders to five health insurers and two health systems requiring them to provide information that will assist the FTC in studying the competitive effects of certificates of public advantage (COPAs) with respect to prices, quality, access and innovation in healthcare. The orders were sent on October 21 to Aetna, Anthem, Blue Cross Blue Shield … Continue Reading

Direct Patient Billing Can Create Provider Liability in Florida

To bill or not to bill, that is the question. Or, more appropriately, who to bill and when to bill, that is the question. Providers who bill patients under the circumstances described below may face liability. What is a provider to do?

A patient was injured in the course of her employment in December 2013 and applied for workers’ compensation … Continue Reading

Addressing Acute Mental Health Concerns: Parkland’s Legacy – Florida’s Red Flag Law

We are all too aware of the horrors of the Parkland shooting. In response to that awful day, the Florida Legislature enacted Florida Statute Section 790.401 in 2018, “the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Safety Act.”  Part of this new law is the “red flag” provision which allows courts to proactively remove firearms from individuals who pose a significant danger … Continue Reading

Healthcare Providers Must Remember HIPAA Before Responding to Online Reviews

The latest HIPAA resolution agreement by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (OCR) is a reminder that healthcare providers must take the high road when responding to unflattering online reviews by patients. While it is tempting to respond to a bad and perhaps untrue online review, healthcare providers need to take care to not … Continue Reading

Possible Relief for Hospitals in the Protection of PSO Information?

Last Thursday, September 5, 2019, Judge James Moody, Jr. of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida issued a positive ruling for hospitals dealing with patient safety organization (PSO) data. The opinion can be reviewed here. Note, while this decision is not binding on state courts, it is persuasive authority. It may be used to … Continue Reading

Long Delayed CVS/Aetna Merger Finally Gains Court Approval

Concluding one of the longest merger reviews in history, on September 4, Judge Richard Leon, District Judge for the District of Columbia, issued his final ruling in United States v. CVS Health, approving the proposed settlement of the United States’ challenge to CVS’s merger with Aetna. The ruling concludes Judge Leon’s eleven month review of the proposed settlement, during … Continue Reading

Florida Board of Pharmacy Initiates Work on International Export Pharmacy Permit Application and Rules

International export pharmacies took another step forward towards a separate, distinct licensure in Florida as the Florida Board of Pharmacy held a specially called Rules Sub-Committee Meeting on June 27, 2019, to address the Board’s responsibilities under House Bill 19, which went into effect on July 1, 2019. Section 465.0157, FS, establishes an “international export pharmacy” permit as part of … Continue Reading

Owner of Medical Marketing Company Found Guilty in $2 Million Medicare Fraud Scheme…Again!

The Department of Justice announced on June 27, 2019 that David Brock Lovelace, the owner of DBL Management LLC, was found guilty by a federal jury in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida of conspiracy to pay healthcare kickbacks and structuring currency transactions to avoid reporting requirements. According to the evidence at trial, Lovelace was paid … Continue Reading

Paper Prescription Pads to go the Way of the Horse and Buggy as Prescribers Will Soon Be Required to Electronically Transmit Prescriptions – Sometimes

Governor Desantis recently signed House Bill 831, which will require certain healthcare practitioners to “electronically transmit prescriptions”. Unfortunately, the legislature left this term undefined, creating some ambiguity as to what the law requires. While the legislature likely intended this law to require “electronic prescribing,” the statute does not say that, and therefore the term “electronically transmit prescriptions” could also … Continue Reading

Florida Patient Brokering Act Amended – Does it Clarify or Create New Issues?

The Florida Legislature recently passed HB 369 (the Bill), which would tweak an important provision of the Florida Patient Brokering Act, Section 817.505 of the Florida Statutes (Patient Brokering Act).  It seeks to clarify the exception to the Patient Brokering Act which incorporated by reference the criminal provisions of the federal Anti-Kickback Statute (42 U.S.C. S1320a-7b(b)) pertaining to illegal remuneration) … Continue Reading

A Wake Up Call for Hospital Boards

The Georgia Legislature recently passed House Bill 321 (the Act) adding a new code section (O.C.G.A. §31-7-22), which imposes significant financial and business transparency requirements on certain hospitals in Georgia, including non-profit hospitals. Beginning October 1, 2019, non-profit hospitals operating in Georgia will be required to post links in a prominent location on their homepages. These links must direct the … Continue Reading

FTC Prevails in Physician Merger Case Before the 8th Circuit

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals recently handed the Federal Trade Commission another appellate victory in its efforts to curtail anticompetitive mergers in the healthcare industry, affirming the FTC’s earlier District Court victory in Federal Trade Commission v. Sanford Health. The decision follows a number of other recent FTC appellate victories in healthcare merger cases – in the … Continue Reading

Supreme Court Resolves Statute of Limitation Circuit Split in False Claims Act Cases

Last month, in a unanimous decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the analysis of the applicable statute of limitations under the False Claims Act (FCA) as set forth in 31 U.S.C. § 3731 is the same regardless of whether the government intervenes in the action or not.  While the decision is not likely to affect either the government … Continue Reading

Georgia Leads the Way with Enactment of Pharmacy Anti-Steering Law

With an overwhelming amount of bi-partisan support, on May 7, 2019, Georgia enacted the Pharmacy Anti-Steering and Transparency Act, O.C.G.A. §26-4-119 (the GA Act). The GA Act goes into effect as of January 1, 2020.

As healthcare providers are well aware, prohibitions against self-referrals are not new – federal and state laws prohibiting self-referrals by physicians and other healthcare … Continue Reading

Caution: Curb Your Enthusiasm for the Reduced HIPAA Annual Limits

Until recently, the annual limit for civil monetary penalties (CMP) that could be levied against covered entities and business associates in violation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, and their implementing regulations, as amended from time to time (collectively, HIPAA) was $1,500,000. On … Continue Reading

2019 Legislative Session – The Passage of Telehealth (HB 23)

In the closing days of this year’s legislative session, the Florida House and Senate came to agreement on statutory language that adopts the parameters for telehealth for Florida. HB 23, sponsored by Representative Clay Yarborough, establishes a statutory basis for telehealth services, provides meaningful definitions of the terms telehealth and telehealth provider, and creates Section 456.47 Florida Statutes which … Continue Reading

Florida Legislature Repeals its “Certificate of Need” Law

In a somewhat surprising move, on April 29, 2019 the Florida Legislature passed legislation (HB 21) that repeals the state’s “Certificate of Need” (CON) laws with respect to general hospitals and tertiary services. Such laws, which are in place in many states, typically prohibit a healthcare provider from expanding its services and from entering new markets absent its … Continue Reading

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