Richard T. Jones

Richard T. Jones

A veteran lawyer with more than four decades of experience, Richard Jones represents physicians, not-for-profit mental health facilities, and other healthcare providers in contract matters, licensure matters, Medicare and Medicaid programs, and general healthcare litigation. Clients rely on Richard’s deep knowledge of the medical-legal aspects from the healthcare provider perspective, with an emphasis on mental health provider issues.

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Are Recommendations of the White House Task Force on Behavioral Health Parity Trumped by the Election?

Recently the White House Behavioral Health Parity Task Force issued guidance on the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (Parity Law). The Task Force could not have known, though, that on November 8th, the election may have changed the direction of the Task Force report and subsequent implementation. … Continue Reading

Hospitals & Medical Staff Take Notice: HCQIA Immunity is Not Given, it’s Earned.

The Healthcare Quality Improvement Act of 1986 (“HCQIA”) is a federal law enacted to establish a national tracking system of healthcare practitioners with a history of medical malpractice payments or adverse actions. A significant provision of the law provides immunity from civil money damages for those who participate in hospital peer review process, including members of the medical staff.  In … Continue Reading

It’s Never too Late to Give Guidance: OCR Starts Releasing HIPAA Omnibus Rule Guidance in Anticipation of September 23 Compliance Deadline

This has been a busy week for the Department of Health and Human Services / Office for Civil Rights (HHS/OCR).  It has started releasing guidance on various provisions of the Omnibus HIPAA final rule (the “Final Rule”) in advance of the September 23, 2013 compliance date.  The guidance includes:

1. Model Notices of Privacy Practices

A significant provision of the

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U.S. Supreme Court tells Hospitals to Say: “Sorry Officer, I need a warrant to draw that patient’s blood.”

On April 17, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court in Missouri v. McNeely ruled that in drunk-driving investigations where Law Enforcement Officers (“LEOs”) can reasonably obtain a warrant before a blood sample can be drawn, the Fourth Amendment mandates they do so.

A.  The Fourth Amendment Protects Against Unreasonable Searches and Seizures

The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution states it … Continue Reading

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